There are many different types of e-cigarettes in use, also known as Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS), with varying amounts of nicotine and harmful emissions. ENDS emissions typically contain nicotine and other toxic substances that are harmful to both users and those exposed to the vapours secondhand.

Are e-cigarettes and other vaping products dangerous?

There are many different types of e-cigarettes.  E-cigarettes are the most common form of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) and electronic non-nicotine delivery systems (ENNDS) but there are others, such as e-cigars, e-pipes, etc. ENDS contain varying amounts of nicotine and harmful emissions.

E-cigarette emissions typically contain nicotine and other toxic substances that are harmful to both users, and non-users who are exposed to the aerosols secondhand. Some products claiming to be nicotine-free have been found to contain nicotine.

Evidence reveals that these products are harmful to health and are not safe. However, it is too early to provide a clear answer on the long-term impact of using them or being exposed to them.

They are particularly risky when used by children and adolescents. Nicotine is highly addictive and young people’s brains develop up to their mid-twenties. Exposure to nicotine of children and adolescents can have long-lasting, damaging effects on brain development and there is risk of nicotine addiction.

Furthermore, there is a growing body of evidence in some settings that never-smoker minors who use ENDS at least double their chance of starting to smoke conventional tobacco cigarettes later in life.

ENDS use increases the risk of heart disease and lung disorders.  They also pose significant risks to pregnant women who use them, as they can damage the growing fetus.

ENDS also expose non-smokers and bystanders to nicotine and other harmful chemicals.

Exposure of children to ENDS liquid continues to pose serious risks. There is a risk of the devices leaking, or of children swallowing the liquid, and ENDS have been known to cause serious injuries, including burns, through fires and explosions.

Read full article here.

World Health Organization – January 29, 2020.

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